Before the boys of Coldplay were headlining major festivals, selling out stadiums, winning every award imaginable, and scoring #1 hits all over the world, they started out just like everyone else; they were an indie band. Their incredible (and often criminally ignored) debut album, Parachutes, was actually preceded by a trio of EPs, following a trend that has still proven to be successful today. The Brothers and Sisters EP (sometimes referred to as a proper single) is an anomaly in their discography. The three track extended play is the sole release from their brief tenure with indie label, Fierce Panda Records, sandwiched in between the self-released The Safety EP and their first major label effort, The Blue Room EP. All of the tracks in their original form are exclusive to the release, unlike Safety, which helped populate Blue Room and subsequent b-sides; the title track was re-recorded and re-structured to act as a b-side for the single “Trouble.” The other two, “Easy To Please” and “Only Superstition” can only be found here, making them their only proper indie tracks. The best of the pair is the latter, an upbeat, but simple alternative rock song. “Only Superstition” really exemplifies just how far the band has come, but that they’ve always had a natural talent about them. Stripped of all pretense, Chris Martin’s vocals are strikingly timid, almost as if he doesn’t trust his now-iconic falsetto yet, while Johnny Buckland’s guitar revolves around filling the space with brilliant parts as opposed to showing off his skills, a sty;e that continues to work for him today. Lyrically, the band tackles similar themes of paranoid that were later perfected in “Clocks,” making this track an insightful precursor to the music that made them the biggest band in the world. “Only Superstition” isn’t their best work, but it represents the essence of a group on the cusp of making it, and the excitement in their hunger is palpable.

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